Plants Viewer



S_anthurium_scherzerianum-c_flamingo_flower

Anthurium scherzerianum Flamingo Flower

in

Spring to Winter


Back to Plant list or

Click the header picture to return to the homepage       


Anthurium is a large genus of about 600-1,000 species, belonging to the arum family (Araceae). They have a wide number of common names and are often called "Flamingo Flower", "Tailflower" or "Boy Flower", which refer to the structure of the spathe and spadix part of the flower spike.
Anthuriums can flower from spring ‘till autumn if they have the right conditions. First of all Anthurium plant is thermophyte which is a plant tolerant of, or thriving at, high temperatures and in this case high humidity. A plant that survives the winter as a seed and completes its life cycle between the spring and autumn.
Indoor room temperature should be moderately warm in summer, and in winter it should be above 18 0C or higher. It does not like drafts of cold air and is one reason why I have not had much success in overwintering these plants. They like bright light, but not direct sunlight. In winter they also need bright light.
Watering is also improtant the water should be soft not be hard or alkaline, better boiled but in any case it shouldbe warm. Water regularly, but do not let the water stagnate in the underpot. Wash away or wile any dust from Anthurium’s leaves and it is desirable to spray them often. During the growth period Anthuriums should be fed every two weeks with mineral or organic fertilizers.
Like most plants Anthuriums have a rest in winter, when the temperature is lower, watering and feeding of the plant are considerably reduced, but the soil in your pot should never dry out. Anthuriums are best replanted in spring into a slightly wider and taller pot with well drainage so that they can be planted a little bit lower than they grew before. Moss over the tops of the soil will help prevent drying out.
As they do not like alkaline soils Anthuriums would be a mixture of fibrous leaf compost. The roots needs air and therefore the soil be not firmed too much.



Back to top of page