Glossary Entries




From JACULATE To LUTE   


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Name Origin Description Extra
J
JACULATE
v [L.jaculator, shooter]
To throw or cast out, to emit. cf.[EJACULATE]
JAVA MAN
n [Ind. jawa, java; Snkrt. manu, man]
Java Man is the name given to a fossil hominid discovered in 1891 in Java.It is one of the earliest known specimens of Homo erectus comming from the Meso Pleistocene era. Its discoverer, Eugène Dubois, gave it the scientific name Pithecanthropus erectus, a name derived from Greek and Latin roots meaning upright ape-man.
JOHN INNES COMPOST
n [Mod.E. from John innes institute; L. compositum, something put together]
Loam-based compost devised by the John Innes Horticultural Institute in Norwich, and made to a standard formula.
JURASSIC
a [L. juria, forest; jura, forest montain; ic, forming adjective]
The Jurassic is a geologic period from about 200 to 146 million years ago. It is the middle period of the Mesozoic era between the Triassic and the Cretaceous periods. It is also known as the "Age of Reptiles". cf.[TRIASSIC, CRETACEOUS]
K
KENESIS
n [Gk. kenesis, movement]
Kinesisis a random movement or activity of a cell or an organism in response to a stimulus until it gets to a better environment. cf.[TAXIS]
KETONE
n [Ger. aketon, acetone]
In organic chemistry, a ketone is a molecule with the structure RC(=O)R', where R and R' can be a variety of atoms or groups of atoms. It features a carbonyl group (C=O) bonded between two other carbon atoms. Acetone is the simplest example of a ketone. When fat is broken down in the body, ketones are produced. Ketones are strong acids and are harmful to your body. Ketones in your urine may be a sign that you are developing diabetes as fats are usually only broken down when there is not enough insulin in your body.
KETONE BODIES
n [Ger. aketon, acetone; O.E. bodig, body]
Ketone bodies are water-soluble compounds formed by fatty acid oxidation by acetyl coenzyme A. They are used as a source of energy in the heart and brain especially at times of fasting. Acetone, Acetoacetic acid, and Beta-hydroxybutyric acid are all called ketone bodies.
KNOT GARDEN
n [A.S. cnotta, knot; O.Fr. jardin, yard]
Beds laid out in a formal often complex, pattern, formed from dwarf hedges or clipped herbs.
L
LABELLUM
n [L. labium, lip]
In orchids the lower petal which forms the lip of the flower.
LABIUM
n [L. labium, lip]
The bottom of a corolla in which the upper and lower parts can be clearly distinguished
LABRUM
n [L. labrum, lip]
The upper part of a corolla in which the upper and lower sides can be clearly distinguished
LACERATE
a [L. lacerare, to tear]
(of leaves) Irregularly cut .
LAMINA
n [L. lamina, plate]
The thin, flat blade of a leaf or petal.
LANCEOLATE
a [L. lanceola, little lance]
Narrow, as a lance, with tapering ends. Image /leafshapes/9?gloss=1&ordr=0&telephone=3
LATERAL
a [L. latus, side]
Arising from the side of the parent axis or attached to the side of another organ. Image /leafshapes/106?gloss=1&ordr=0&telephone=3
LATEX
n [L. latex, a liquid]
A milky and usually whitish fluid that is produced by the cells of various plants and is the source of, eg rubber, gutta percha, chicle and balata.
LATICIFEROUS
a [L. latex, liquid; ferre, to carry]
Producing a milky juice (latex).
LAYER PLANTING
a [M.E. layer, mason; Gk. phyton, plant]
A form of interplanting in which groups of plants flower in succession having been planted closely together.
LAYERING
a [M.E. layer, mason]
A method of propagation by which a shoot is induced to root while still attached to the parent plant. The basic form is self layering, which occurs naturally in some plants. Methods include: air layering (also known as Chinese layering or marcottage), French layering, mound layering (see MOUND LAYERING, SERPRNTINE LAYERING,SIMPLE LAYERING, STOOLING, TIP LAYERING, and TRENCH LAYERING.
LEACHING
n [O.E. leccan, causing to leak]
The loss from the topsoil of soluble nutrients by downward drainage.
LEADER
n [A.S. leadan to lead]
I ) The main, usually central, stem of a plant. 2) The terminal shoot of a main branch.
LEAF
n [A.S. leaf, leaf]
An aerial and lateral outgrowth from a stem which makes up the foliage of a plant. Its prime function is the manufacture of food by photosynthesis. It typically consists of a stalk (petiole) and a flattened blade (lamina).
LEAF BLADE
n [A.S. leaf, leaf; O.E. blaed, knife blade]
The area of the leaf (as differentiated from the stem of the leaf).
LEAF CUTTING
n [A.S. leaf, leaf]
A cutting taken from a detached leaf or part of a leaf. See Cutting.
LEAF MOULD
n [A.S. leaf, leaf; O.E. molde, pulverise]
Fibrous, flaky material derived from decomposed leaves, used as an ingredient in potting media and as a soil improver.
LEAF-BUD CUTTING
n [A.S. leaf, leaf]
A cutting consisting of a short section of stem and a single or double pair of buds or leaves. See also: Cutting.
LEAFLET
n [A.S. leaf,leaf]
Each separate lamina of a compound leaf.
LEGUME
n [L. legumen, pulse]
A one-celled, dehiscent.fruit splitting at maturity into two, belonging to the family Leguminosae.
LIANA
n [L. ligare, to bind]
A woody, climbing vine.
LIGHT
a [O.E. leoht, light]
1) The movable cover of a cold frame. 2) Of soil, with a high proportion of sand and little clay.
LIGULATE
a [L. ligula, little tongue]
Strap-shaped or tongue-shaped . Image /leafshapes/11?gloss=1&ordr=0&telephone=3
LIGULE
n [L. ligula, little tongue]
(of leaves) A scale-like membrane on the surface of a leaf (of flowers) the strapshaped corolla in some Compositae.
LIMB
n [A.S. lim, limb]
The upper, expanded portion of a calyx or corolla with fused parts cf. TUBE.
LIME
n [L. limus, mud]
Loosely, a number of compounds of calcium the amount of lime in soil determines whether it is alkaline, acid, or neutral.
LIMEN
n [L. limen, threshold]
The minimum level of a stimulus that is perceptible. A demarcation line like the strip of stone or wood at the entrance to a doorway.
LINE OUT
a [L. linea, line; O.E. ut, out]
To plant out young plants or insert cuttings in lines in a nursery bed or frame.
LINEAR
a [L. linea, line]
(of leaves) Elongated, and with parallel sides. Image leafshapes/10?gloss=1&ordr=0&telephone=3
LITHOPHYTE
n [Gk. lithos, stone; phyton, plant]
A plant naturally growing on rocks (or in very stony soil) and usually obtaining most of its nutrients and water from the atmosphere.
LOAM
n [M.E. lome, clay]
A term used for soil of medium texture, often easily worked, that contains more or less equal parts of sand, silt, and clay, and is usually rich in humus. If the proportion of one ingredient is high, the term may be qualified as silt-loam, clay-loam, or sandy loam.
LOBE
n [Gk. lobos, lobe]
(of leaves or perianths) A curved or rounded part. Image /leafshapes/31?gloss=1&ordr=0&telephone=3
LOBED
a [Gk. lobos, lobe]
(of leaves) With curved or rounded edges.
LOCULE
n [L. loculus, compartment]
The chamber or cavity of an ovary which contains the ovules, or of an anther which contains the pollen.
LOCULICIDAL
a [L. loculus, compartment; caedere, to cut]
Splitting open longitudinally along the dorsal suture (mid-rib) of each segment of the wall.
LORATE
a [L. lorum, thong]
(of leaves) The leaves are strap shaped like the leaves of Clivia. Image /leafshapes/102?gloss=1&ordr=0&telephone=3
LUTE
n [L. lutum, potter's clay]
A piece of equipment used for working (luting) top-dressings into lawns.

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